Effective Online Learning Covers All Steps of Bloom’s Taxonomy

In previous posts, I talked about learning as a process, the elements of the learning process, and our formula for online student engagement. Particularly student engagement (or the lack thereof) as measured by completion rates is often seen as key metric. And to some extent this makes sense. If you are disengaged you won’t learn. But engagement is just the necessary condition for learning. It is what learners do while they are engaged that determines the actual outcome of learning. Therefore, including all three elements of learning in the learning process is the sufficient condition for effective online learning.

High-quality content and storytelling ensure engagement. Active and social learning ensure that learners gain a comprehensive and deep understanding. An understanding that goes beyond the ability to regurgitate facts and answer basic questions.

How do we know this? Because instructional designs that include all three elements (content, context and community) cover all steps of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning (2001 revised edition, Taxonomy of Educational Objectives was originally published in 1956). Ok, let me put this in normal words and less jargon.

Bloom’s Taxonomy Explained

The reason why fun, active, and social learning is effective is that different activities build on each other. These learning activities progressively lead the learner to a deeper and more comprehensive understanding of the subject matter at hand. At first, after watching a video or reading a text, learners know that a given fact, phenomenon or theory exists. They may also understand it well enough to answer basic questions about it.

But only when they take this new knowledge and apply it in a different context – for example by working on a case study – do they gain a deeper understanding. By analysing and evaluating other people’s work, learners have to confront alternative perspectives and approaches grappling with the same topic. Creating their own work – reflecting on the subject, solving a word problem, drafting a presentation or plan – ultimately demonstrates whether they have mastered the subject at hand. If an online course includes all of these activities, learners will not only know more. They will also be able to apply their knowledge and, most importantly, act differently in practice. THAT is what we mean by effective online learning.

elearning May Be Cheap, But It’s Not Effective Online Learning

Traditional elearning (e.g. in the form of web-based trainings or WBTs) is not much more than an interactive textbook. It’s essentially broadcast learning, where learners passively consume content in isolation. This works well if the objective is to provide them with basic knowledge. They can familiarise themselves with a topic and gain a basic understanding. But this will do relatively little to affect their performance on the job. To change attitudes and behaviour, learning activities have to cover more – ideally all – steps of Bloom’s taxonomy.  

Bloom's Taxonomy - traditional elearning vs effective online Learning

In other words, to achieve the learning outcomes in corporate training and professional development, we need a L&D format that does not just simulate learning. We cannot speak of effective online learning unless it affects the learners’ performance on the job. We design iversity PRO courses on the basis of this understanding of learning and with this objective in mind. The feature set of the iversity platform not only supports a broad range of effective online learning activities. It also provides a variety of ways for users to interact. Organisations can also use the iversity platform in order to host courses that follow these design principles by setting up a branded academy.

Learners reach advanced learning outcomes because we cover all steps of Bloom’s taxonomy and embed content and assignments in a social context. This new form of effective online learning makes it possible to learn topics online that were previously thought impossible to learn effectively in a digital environment. Prime examples of such topics are leadership, communication, and change management.